Islamic Relief has provided widowed women living in Rawalpindi, Pakistan, with essential healthcare.

The two-year project served women in the area with children enrolled on our orphan sponsorship scheme – families who rely on the regular stipend they receive in order to provide for their children.

Akash received life-saving treatment in December, and is recovering well.

Akash received life-saving treatment in December, and is recovering well.

Around 1,200 women were given free health screening, which was also provided to orphaned children sponsored by Islamic Relief as well as their siblings. Around 1,800 children were screened.

Almost 160 people were referred to a private hospital, with costs covered for treatment and follow-on care for a range of conditions including heart disease, diabetes and brain tumours.

Hassan Muhammad was one of the children that benefitted from the project. Diagnosed with a life-threatening heart condition aged just five, Islamic Relief covered the costs of his surgery and post-operative care.

Akash, 8, also had cardiac defects. He was referred to a renowned institute of cardiology, where he underwent a life-saving operation in December, funded through Islamic Relief. He is now receiving post-operative care and is recovering fast.

“I can’t thank you [enough] for what you have done for my child,” said Akash’s mother. “God has sent you people to support me, and you have proved that there are still good people on this earth.”

In addition, all the women and 4,470 children received de-worming treatment.

Mobile clinics providing primary healthcare

Women and children received free health screening and medical treatment.

Women and children received free health screening and medical treatment.

Our mobile medical clinics, which operated four days a week in local communities, provided primary healthcare to 2,616 poor people – mostly women and children – treating ailments such as skin infections, typhoid, and minor injuries.

About 80 people were referred to a diagnostic centre, and those diagnosed with serious illnesses such as tuberculosis went on to receive treatment at specialist facilities.

The project also boosted community health, with scores of sessions to promote health and hygiene delivered. Our community-awareness work also sought to prevent the spread of diseases such as hepatitis, diarrhoea, and malaria.

In total, some 7,086 families benefitted from the project, which ended last summer. It is one of a range of schemes delivered by Islamic Relief in Pakistan, a country in which around 50 million people live in poverty – many without access to even basic services.